Convergence of the twain analysis

The mirrors not only serve no meaningful purpose here but juxtaposed with sea worms, bring to us the notion of the emptiness of vanity.

The convergence of the twain rhythm

From Stanza VI onwards, the poet moves on to the inevitability of the decree of Fate. The manuscript of this poem bears the date 24 April In the first five stanzas, Hardy's descriptions of the Titanic are consistently juxtaposed against the ship's present environment to emphasize the waste of money, technology, and craftsmanship. They both grow unknown to each other. Stanza 2 At the bottom of the ocean are the steel chambers that formed the core of the ship. Stanza 6 While this sleek and fast ship was being made, other things were set in motion by the divine force that moves and controls everything. Hardy is very interested in affiliating the growth and fate of the iceberg and ship through the deification of nature and time. The ship and the iceberg take birth at the same time. There is no light at the bottom of the sea so the jewels do not sparkle. But ironically none of the pomp and splendor that marked the ship were of any use to them.

The die is cast for an event that is still far in the future. The poem's major ideas concern the vessel, its state, and symbolic significance two years after the collision, and a speculation on how the iceberg came to converge with the ship.

Hardy suggests that the Titanic converging with the iceberg was not a coincidence, but rather an event planned by an "Immanent Will" 18 and "The Spinner of the Years" 31 ; inferring the ship had been destined for destruction since its inception.

From Stanza VI onwards, the poet moves on to the inevitability of the decree of Fate.

Channel firing analysis

The mirrors not only serve no meaningful purpose here but juxtaposed with sea worms, bring to us the notion of the emptiness of vanity. The poet's use of multiple adjectives and alliteration intensifies the somber nature of these descriptions. The ship had been conceived as the last word in luxury, it resembled a floating palace with sweeping staircases and ballrooms. They both grow unknown to each other. Stanza 7 The Immanent Will has chosen for this brittle but pretty ship, a mate that is just its opposite. Both grow in stature each unaware that their fates are entwined. No human eye can gaze at their beauty so they have no value.

The rhyme scheme is AAA. The first five stanzas of the poem concern the submerged ship itself, while the last six discuss its fate while afloat. The items which appear in Hardy's poem are representative of the power, wealth and vanity of the British nation.

the convergence of the twain lesson

Titanic sank on 12 April Stanza 1 The poet introduces the setting of the sea in the first line itself. Where there was once heat and life driving the engines of the ship, there is now coldness and death.

Once fate decrees, no one can stop an event. Hardy uses words such as "mate" 19"intimate welding" 27and "consummation" 33 to emphasize the apparent predestination that these two behemoths seemed to have, and to imply a wedding or sexual union of those mighty opposites.

Stanza 7 The Immanent Will has chosen for this brittle but pretty ship, a mate that is just its opposite.

Juxtaposition in the convergence of the twain

The ship had been conceived as the last word in luxury, it resembled a floating palace with sweeping staircases and ballrooms. The first five stanzas are a robust criticism of fruitless human vanity. The furnaces of the ship, which contained "salamandrine fires" 5 , now have "Cold currents thrid" 6 through them. The poet capitalizes Immanent Will to show its importance and force. Where there was once heat and life driving the engines of the ship, there is now coldness and death. There is no light at the bottom of the sea so the jewels do not sparkle. The poem's major ideas concern the vessel, its state, and symbolic significance two years after the collision, and a speculation on how the iceberg came to converge with the ship. Although he does not indicate implicitly that he believes in the powers he names, Hardy weaves these deifications into the poem to create a desired effect. From Stanza VI onwards, the poet moves on to the inevitability of the decree of Fate. There is no neck or arm on which the jewels can be displayed to please the vanity of the wearer. The die is cast for an event that is still far in the future. The items which appear in Hardy's poem are representative of the power, wealth and vanity of the British nation. Hardy further emphasizes the waste of the ship's magnificence by describing how useless the "opulent mirrors" are to uncomprehending sea-worms that are "grotesque, slimed, dumb, indifferent" 9. But at the given moment, the master puppeteer whom Hardy refers to as the Spinner of the Years, given the signal and the two opposing forces meet causing destruction and loss of life.
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The Convergence of the Twain Analysis